• Green Party Peace Sign Bumper Sticker


    Green Party Peace Sign Bumper Sticker
    The Green Party has continually opposed entry into war and has consistently called for the immediate return of our troops, in stark contrast to the Democratic and Republican parties.
    Today we march, tomorrow we vote Green Party.

  • Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened?

    Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened? ebook cover

    |

    Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened? eBook

    Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened? eBook on Amazon

    Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened? eBook

    Reflections on Occupy Wall Street, with photos, fun, and good wishes for the future. eBook, Occupy Wall Street: What Just Happened? (Only $.99 !) In the eBook, the Occupy movement is explored through original reporting, photographs, cartoons, poetry, essays, and reviews.The collection of essays and blog posts records the unfolding of Occupy into the culture from September 2011 to the present.  Authors Kimberly Wilder and Ian Wilder were early supporters of Occupy, using their internet platforms to communicate the changes being created by the American Autumn.

    The eBook is currently available on Amazon for Kindle;  Barnes & Noble Nook ; Smashwords independent eBook seller; and a Kobo for 99 cents and anyone can read it using their Kindle/Nook Reader, smart phone, or computer.

  • Vintage Jewelry


    Please visit our Etsy shop at: Wilderside Vintage and Antique Jewelry
    Eco-Fashion!
    Choosing vintage or antique jewelry to wear and/or gift, is a way to be gentle on the planet. Remembering the Waste Hierarchy Triangle, folks who love the planet should always try to…”Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”. Please share or donate your own jewelry and try buying vintage rather than new.

  • FaceBook

  • Instagram

    Instagram
  • tumblr

  • Pinterest

  • Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire: Ultimate Fan Guide on Smashwords

Edgewood Preserve Winter 2008/9 newsletter

Update, July 2010: Important video about unlawful clearing of trees from the preserve. See onthewilderside post: here.
_________________

Dear Friends,

Attached is our Winter 2009 newsletter.

This will be the last newsletter that Friends of the Edgewood-Oakbrush Preserve will send to our entire mailing list. Beginning with the spring issue, only donors will receive the newsletter. We are at a turning point – forced to implement some changes – mostly good ones – in order for us to grow and fulfill our mission as a publicly supported organization. We trust that you have enjoyed the newsletter, and hope you will want to receive future issues by becoming a member. Membership will ensure that you continue to receive this newsletter, as well as regular updates about events and activities.

Older issues of our newsletter will be posted on our website once a new issue is published. Our website is currently being developed and we hope to have much of it completed by spring. When we began just four short years ago, we had to do what was necessary. At the preserve, that meant clearing out lots of old debris and securing the preserve from ATV use. In the office, it meant letting the community know who we were and what we intended to do. This newsletter was a big part of that. Over the past two years, a full board has enabled us to not only do what’s necessary (fight the intermodal, for instance, even though we’d rather be doing other things) but move on to what’s possible (offering bird and nature walks, building our cadre of volunteers, getting young people involved in stewardship, implementing Scouts projects, getting other respected groups like Great South Bay Audubon Society, Long Island Greenbelt Trail, Seatuck, Long Island Botanical Society, Long Island Mycological Society, and Sierra Club to visit, use and help with the preserve).

Now, in 2009, it is time to move on to the impossible dreams: building a bench around the chestnut oak in the parking area, getting a visitor center funded and built, beginning a substantial planting/beautification effort in the parking lot, finishing a website, and planning our first fundraiser. This is a very hopeful time for Edgewood and the community – in spite of all that is wrong in the world. Please consider being part of the Edgewood family by donating or volunteering.
We are proud of what we have accomplished with little money and no paid staff. What keeps us going is the belief that this rare and fragile wildlife habitat matters. Our collective future depends on the watchful stewardship of our open spaces. Thank you for your support. Here’s wishing you and yours a happy and healthful new year. We hope to see you at Edgewood in 2009.
Patricia Burkhart
Friends of the Edgewood Preserve
P.O. Box 162
Deer Park, NY 11729
631-242-7402

Friends of Edgewood News

The QuarterlyNewsletter of Friends of the Edgewood-OakBrush Plains Preserve

An all-volunteer, not for profit organization dedicated to protecting the natural beauty
& improving the conditions of the Edgewood State Nature Preserve through advocacy and education

Winter 2009 •
Volume 3, Issue 2

Edgewood’s Angels

There was a time not too long ago, when just getting people to walk the trails of the Edgewood
Preserve was a daunting challenge. Times have changed. Now, we can’t keep up with the inquiries from
Long Islanders who want to help improve this wonderful but under-appreciated nature preserve.
Throughout 2008, the preserve parking lot was full on most weekends and often on weekdays too. It
seems that four solid years of hard work has finally paid off. But none of it would be possible without
angels. To survive and thrive, non-profit organizations need angels. Money angels, advisor angels,
cheerleader angels, and most important of all: volunteer angels. Without volunteers, most nonprofits
would have to close their doors. Even nonprofits that have lots of money need volunteers. Without
them, something vibrant and real is missing. Volunteers say to the world: I’m here because I want to be
here, and I want to be here because this is important. In spite of some very disappointing setbacks in
2008, Friends of Edgewood considers itself abundantly blessed, because in 2008, so many volunteers
helped improve the preserve, thereby enabling us to continue to protect what’s important. What
follows below and inside are just a few examples of the many angels who graced the preserve with their
hard work, generosity, enthusiasm, curiosity and genuine concern.

Photograph courtesy of Valerie Pfundstein.
In the fall of 2008, Deer Park Girl Scout Cadette Troop 3844 spent two long days clearing overgrowth and debris from the
fenced areas in the parking lot at the preserve. Pictured from left to right: Alyson Michelek, Rosanna Sinni, Kimberly Blair,
Lauren Gentile, Catherine Pfundstein and Nicole Ingrassia. Also, in 2008, Deer Park Girl Scout Troop 1163 (not pictured)
adopted the Pretty Path Trail at Edgewood. Kimberly Block, Larisa Zambelli, Meghan Wright, Alejandra Pinzon and Sydney
Giannini worked hard throughout the year to keep the trail free from litter and overgrowth. Want to help? Let us know!

FRIENDS OF EDGEWOOD NEWS
Volume 3, Issue 2, Winter 2009
RIENDS OF EDGEWOOD NEWS
Volume 3, Issue 2, Winter 2009

Published by:

Friends of the Edgewood Preserve

P.O. Box 162
Deer Park, NY 11729
Tel: (631) 242-7402
E-mail:
pburkhart@friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org
Website:
www.friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org

Board of Directors

Denis Byrne, President
Paul Tomko, Vice-President
Sid Cherry, Treasurer
Patricia Burkhart, Secretary
Mary Beth Tomko, Board Member

Newsletter Editor

Patricia Burkhart

The Edgewood-Oak Brush Plains Preserve is an
850-acre nature preserve, situated within the towns
of Babylon and Huntington. It is a rare and
irreplaceable pitch-pine scrub oak wildlife habitat,
home to a wide array of bird and plant species, as
well as other animals and reptiles, including red fox,
rabbits, chipmunks, frogs, and turtles.

The trails and paths are ideal for hiking, walking,
birding – passive and unobtrusive activities. Old
Commack Road, a paved 1.6-mile road that runs
north south is great for jogging and biking. Hunting is
not allowed, nor are all-terrain vehicles, dirt bikes,
snowmobiles, or any motorized vehicles, except for
those authorized by the NYS DEC.

HELPFUL INFORMATION:

• Permits are required, but they are free and are
valid for three years. For an application, go to:
www.dec.state.ny.us/website/reg1/accessperm.pdf or
ask us and we will send one to you!
• To report ATV activity or other trespassing at
the preserve: 1-877-457-5680. Other Edgewood
concerns/problems? Let us know via phone or e-
mail and we will notify the DEC. Thank you!
President’s Message

It’s hard to believe a new year has begun.
Seems like just yesterday I was marveling over
the arrival of the June cicadas.

We are pleased that overall use of the preserve
has been steadily increasing since 2006, and this
past year was no different.

In September, the Long Island Botanical Society
led a field trip at Edgewood to document the
plant life at the preserve. An article about this
daylong adventure will appear in the spring issue
of our newsletter.

The NYS Senate and Assembly voted almost
unanimously to transfer Pilgrim Hospital land to
the Edgewood Preserve. Astonishingly, on
August 6th Gov. Paterson vetoed the legislation,
bowing to pressure from those who do not
represent Long Island’s best interests. It was a
crushing setback, mostly because it showed an
outrageous disregard for the law and a troubling
disrespect for the lawmakers who do represent
the people of Long Island in Albany as well as
more than a dozen civic and environmental
groups that supported the legislation. As far as
we’re concerned, the Governor listened to the
wrong voices, and we intend to keep fighting until
this parcel of land is duly incorporated into the
preserve as mandated by the Laws of 1987.

We are still waiting for a serious discussion
with Suffolk County officials regarding the
preservation of the old bridge and the planned
Commack road improvements – which are
reckless at best and were approved without any
community discussion by people who do not
know the area very well. Stay tuned.

Our new website is under construction. We
are working with a web designer to create a site
that we hope will attract many visitors. We want
to do it right so some pages may be delayed, but
we hope to have most of it up and running by
spring, if not sooner.

Home Depot will be funding and building a
bench, made from TREX, around the chestnut
oak tree in the parking lot. We hope to begin
construction of this newsworthy project once
the weather warms up.

Happy New Year!

Denis Byrne

EDGEWOOD’s ANGELS 2008
Scouts from Deer Park Girl Scout Cadette Youth Group from the Community Presbyterian Church
Troop 3844 at our November Clean Up. under the director of Tim Ferguson and Rev. John
Underwood explore Edgewood in December as part
of a day dedicated to service and the environment.
EDGEWOOD’s ANGELS 2008
Scouts from Deer Park Girl Scout Cadette Youth Group from the Community Presbyterian Church
Troop 3844 at our November Clean Up. under the director of Tim Ferguson and Rev. John
Underwood explore Edgewood in December as part
of a day dedicated to service and the environment.
George and Harry Kolk in the area they cleared Dr. Andrew Greller and the Long Island Botanical Society
of dense weeds and litter on Thanksgiving weekend. led a field trip in September to help us identify plants.

Deer Park Fire Dept. helped with the Edgewood Volunteers from Brentwood Boy Scout Troop 371 and Charles
bat house installation in May, phase two of Charles Chi Martial Arts Academy join Town of Babylon
of a West Babylon Boy Scout’s Eagle project. Supervisor Steve Bellone at the preserve on Earth Day.

PHOTO CREDITS (left to right): Valerie Pfundstein; Paul Tomko; Barbara Kolk; Paul Tomko; Patricia Burkhart; Steve Gravano.

BARN OWL RESTORATION PROJECT BEGINS AT EDGEWOON PROJECT BEGINS AT EDGEWOOD

The Barn Owl, a nocturnal owl, is the most
widespread owl species in all of North America.
In fact, it is one of the most widely distributed of
all land birds, found on every continent except
Antarctica. It is North America’s only member
of the “Monkey-faced” owl family (Tytonidae).
All other North American owls are from the
family Strigidae.

The Barn Owl is distinctive with buff-colored

in northerly areas, in which case they sometimes
undertake small migrations. Exceptionally cold
winters are one of the primary causes of
mortality, along with cars that often collide with
recently dispersed young.

Photo courtesy of Cornell University.
Although their range encompasses most of the

United States and Mexico, the Barn Owl is not
as plentiful on Long Island as it once was, as
suitable homes have disappeared. The loss of
farms on Long Island has seen the Barn Owl
populations decline dramatically. Unlike other
birds, Barn Owls do not build their own nests,
but rather prefer to construct nests in hollow
trees, barns, abandoned buildings, and even

under bridges. They look for cavities that the
female can recline in, rather than building a nest.

When the Edgewood Hospital buildings were
abandoned many, many years ago, barn owls
found them to be ideal homes. Once the old
buildings were demolished however, the barn
owls disappeared, most likely due to loss of
suitable homes and prey.

wings, a white breast and relatively long, mostly
bare legs. It is a medium-sized owl, about the
size of a Cooper’s Hawk (approximately 16
inches tall). They are easily distinguished from
all other owls by their heart-shaped face, which
is white and fringed with pale, tawny feathers.
The Barn Owl lacks ear tufts. In flight, the
ghostly white underside is quite noticeable.

Unlike most owls that hoot, the common call
of the Barn Owl is a long, hissing shriek –
“csssssssssshhH” – heard year round. Most barn
owls are non-migratory, except for those living

Photo courtesy of Patricia Burkhart.
Barn Owl Nest Box at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

Boxes similar to this will soon be installed at Edgewood.

Now that the preserve and adjacent land is all
grown up, with native foliage regeneration, and
thriving with a variety of wildlife, including voles
and mice (food of choice for barn owls), we
hope to bring the Barn Owl back, with nest
boxes made specifically for Barn owls. In areas
where there is an abundance of prey, nest boxes
have improved Barn Owl populations.

Lucky for us, West Babylon Boy Scout Troop
104 agreed to build four barn owl nest boxes.
The boxes will be installed in early March for the
first time at Edgewood with the help of bird
biologist Chip Hamilton of the NYS Dept. of
Environmental Conservation and the Deer Park
Fire Department, who helped install four Bat
houses last May. Supplies for the construction

of the barn owl nest boxes were funded by a
grant received in 2008 from Suffolk County,
Dept. of Parks, Recreation and Conservation
under the auspices of Legislator Steven Stern.

Let’s hope these special owls find their way
back to Edgewood. On a wing and a prayer…

For more information: Patricia at 631-242-7402 or
pburkhart@friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org

UPCOMING EVENTS EVENTS

All events are free and take place at the Edgewood Preserve (unless otherwise noted).
Meet just inside the parking area. Rain and heavy snow cancels.
The Edgewood Preserve is located on Commack Road in Deer Park.
Trails are flat and easy to walk. No experience is necessary for any of our events.

FEBRUARY

Sunday, February 15, 9:00AM

Presidents’ Weekend Bird Walk
& Great Backyard Bird Count!

Celebrate the long holiday weekend by helping
us count birds at the preserve. Bring a friend or
the entire family and be ready to count! The list
of birds we gather will help scientists. Join tens
of thousands of people across the U.S. and
Canada who will be counting birds too!
Info: Mary Beth at 631-838-4801 or
mbtomko@friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org

Saturday, February 28, 9:00AM-11:00AM

Winter History Hike with Denis Byrne

Get your winter exercise! Come walk the
Edgewood Preserve with Denis. Group will
walk approximately 5 to 6 miles total. Learn about
Edgewood from this Deer Park native and
Long Island history buff. Wear comfortable shoes
and dress warmly.

Raindate: Sunday, February 29, 9:00AM.

Info: Denis at 631-836-2616 or
dbyrne@friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org

MARCH

Saturday, March 21st, 9:00AM

It’s Spring! Bird and Nature Walk

Celebrate the first day of spring and the
new bird season at Edgewood by walking
some trails to look and listen for birds.
Info: Mary Beth at 631-838-4801 or
mbtomko@friendsofedgewoodpreserve.org

EARTH DAY!/EDGEWOOD!

SPECIAL PROGRAM!
12th Annual
GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT!

Monday, February 16th

Parents! Don’t miss this very special joint program
hosted by the Deer Park Community Center and
Friends of the Edgewood Preserve!! This is a great
opportunity for parents to introduce their children to
the world of birds and conservation.

10:30AM – for 3 .
to 5 year olds.
1:00PM – for 6 to 8 year olds.

-Space is limited to 12 children in each session.
-Parents must accompany their child/children.

Sessions begin at the Deer Park Community Center on
Homer Avenue (off Nicolls Road) in Deer Park.
Session includes a story, song and craft and nature
activity (making a bird feeder for the backyard).
Parents will then accompany their child to the nearby
Edgewood Preserve for a short walk (approximately
20-30 minutes) to look for birds, which we will then
submit as our part of the Great Backyard Bird Count!
Be a young scientist! Help us count the birds!

Registration:

Deer Park Community Center at 667-6665. If all
spaces are filled, ask to be put on the waiting list.

APRIL 25, 2009 10:00AM – 2:00PM

trail work • plantings • litter clean up

EDITOR’S CORNER: THE PLAIN AND SIMPLE TRUTH
Truth be told, I prefer the woods in winter. The bones of the forest reveal themselves and the spare
beauty of the winter landscape invites reflection. One can see easily down paths and across fields. The
sounds of birds and wildlife are quieter perhaps, but still there is so much to see and learn. Snow adds a
stunning beauty to the woods, and Edgewood is no exception.
While the rest of the world soon becomes a slushy-sandy gray mess after a snowfall, the preserve
remains a white wonderland for a long time if temperatures remain cold enough. Although you will not
likely meet too many other humans, you will be delighted by the call of a hawk or the sight of a red fox
or rabbit, if you visit early or late in the day. Encounters with chattering chipmunks are frequent. They
seem to find delight in running straight at you at top speed, then at the last minute, veering into the
woods. In my head, I hear Alvin saying to his fellow chipmunks, “that was fun, let’s do it again.”
The best thing about the woods in winter is that we pay attention to where we walk and how we
breathe. The woods remind us that we are a very tiny part of an immense and wise universe. Mostly
though, the woods are about wonder, something that is sorely lacking in our lives. The irony of all our hi-
tech connections, the blackberries and iPhones, is that they have created a seriously disconnected
culture. We have lost touch with our loved ones, our community, and ourselves. We buy and discard
too many things. We know the planet is broken, and yet, what one thing are we doing to fix it? The
Discovery Channel is all well and good, but it is essential to go to the woods now and then to just
connect, to be reminded of the important role we play in sustaining the fragile balance between the
human and natural worlds. Long Island has forever lost so much. We simply must protect what’s left.
On New Year’s Eve, my husband and I went to the woods as dusk fell. It had snowed that day and
we wanted to walk the Edgewood trails with our snowshoes. A young man with his dog was leaving as
we headed down the trail, and we wished each other a happy new year. It was soon dark, but the snow
brightened our way and we saw dozens of animal tracks, especially fox. At one point, as I bent to adjust
my snowshoes, I sensed I was being watched. Sure enough, not more than a few feet from my head, was
a red-tailed hawk watching me intently. There was no doubt who the intruder was. The woods belong
to these creatures. We are visitors here, and that is how it should be. We walked for another hour,
down one trail and up another. As we arrived at Old Commack Road, the snow began to fall again. We
were tired and cold but happy. We hadn’t said much along the way because we had to walk single file
and also because we wanted to listen to the woods, to hear its sounds, and its glorious silences too.
As the snow fell around us, I thought, how blessed I am that I get to protect and care for these
woods. Woods that demand respect but teach us all we need to know, woods that sustain all of us
while providing awe and wonder. We took off our snowshoes and headed down the main path. The
parking lot came into view. I turned and took one final look around. The snow continued to fall over
Edgewood. In a few hours, a new year and its inevitable trials and tribulations would begin. But for that
moment, at a place I have come to love deeply, all was right with the world.
Amid the frenzy of a rather troubled season – peace, joy, and wonder.
EDITOR’S CORNER: THE PLAIN AND SIMPLE TRUTH
Truth be told, I prefer the woods in winter. The bones of the forest reveal themselves and the spare
beauty of the winter landscape invites reflection. One can see easily down paths and across fields. The
sounds of birds and wildlife are quieter perhaps, but still there is so much to see and learn. Snow adds a
stunning beauty to the woods, and Edgewood is no exception.
While the rest of the world soon becomes a slushy-sandy gray mess after a snowfall, the preserve
remains a white wonderland for a long time if temperatures remain cold enough. Although you will not
likely meet too many other humans, you will be delighted by the call of a hawk or the sight of a red fox
or rabbit, if you visit early or late in the day. Encounters with chattering chipmunks are frequent. They
seem to find delight in running straight at you at top speed, then at the last minute, veering into the
woods. In my head, I hear Alvin saying to his fellow chipmunks, “that was fun, let’s do it again.”
The best thing about the woods in winter is that we pay attention to where we walk and how we
breathe. The woods remind us that we are a very tiny part of an immense and wise universe. Mostly
though, the woods are about wonder, something that is sorely lacking in our lives. The irony of all our hi-
tech connections, the blackberries and iPhones, is that they have created a seriously disconnected
culture. We have lost touch with our loved ones, our community, and ourselves. We buy and discard
too many things. We know the planet is broken, and yet, what one thing are we doing to fix it? The
Discovery Channel is all well and good, but it is essential to go to the woods now and then to just
connect, to be reminded of the important role we play in sustaining the fragile balance between the
human and natural worlds. Long Island has forever lost so much. We simply must protect what’s left.
On New Year’s Eve, my husband and I went to the woods as dusk fell. It had snowed that day and
we wanted to walk the Edgewood trails with our snowshoes. A young man with his dog was leaving as
we headed down the trail, and we wished each other a happy new year. It was soon dark, but the snow
brightened our way and we saw dozens of animal tracks, especially fox. At one point, as I bent to adjust
my snowshoes, I sensed I was being watched. Sure enough, not more than a few feet from my head, was
a red-tailed hawk watching me intently. There was no doubt who the intruder was. The woods belong
to these creatures. We are visitors here, and that is how it should be. We walked for another hour,
down one trail and up another. As we arrived at Old Commack Road, the snow began to fall again. We
were tired and cold but happy. We hadn’t said much along the way because we had to walk single file
and also because we wanted to listen to the woods, to hear its sounds, and its glorious silences too.
As the snow fell around us, I thought, how blessed I am that I get to protect and care for these
woods. Woods that demand respect but teach us all we need to know, woods that sustain all of us
while providing awe and wonder. We took off our snowshoes and headed down the main path. The
parking lot came into view. I turned and took one final look around. The snow continued to fall over
Edgewood. In a few hours, a new year and its inevitable trials and tribulations would begin. But for that
moment, at a place I have come to love deeply, all was right with the world.
Amid the frenzy of a rather troubled season – peace, joy, and wonder.
QUOTE FOR THE SEASON:

There is always something
to make you wonder in the shape of
a tree, The trembling of a leaf.

~Albert Schweitzer

Hiking is serious business, especially in winter. Always try to hike with someone. If you do go alone, let others know where
you are going and when you expect to be back. Know your location (make note of landmarks). Carry a cell phone, whistle,
compass and flashlight – they are small and will fit in back or waist pack. Bring water and wear a watch. Dress properly.
If you get lost, don’t panic. Stand still, listen, look and think. And never, ever go off trail looking for short cuts.

THANK YOU TO ALL THE ANGELS,
WHO MAKE SO MUCH POSSIBLE.

DONOR ANGELS 2008 DONOR ANGELS 2009
Helen Alexander Barbara Buscareno
Frank Barracci Joe and Carolyn Ceslik
John Byrne Melany DeSalvo
Sidney and Sherrell Cherry Sandra Douglas
Geier Bindery Alice and Gene Fossner
Paul and Joanne Hartmann Don and Marianne Ottomano
Joel and Margaret Horman William Pelinsky
Shon Isaacs
Hyojung and Jaeran Kim
James and Maura McLoughlin
Patricia Meyer
Mr. Digital Printing
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Murdock
George and Bobby Pettengill
Robert and Victoria Ruvio
Danielle Shuffler
Suffolk County
Rich and Christine Warkenthien
Gerald Wolkoff
Arlene Wynn One of many varieties of dragonflies on the Pilgrim parcel.
ABOVE & BEYOND ANGELS
VOLUNTEER ANGELS Deer Park Community Center
Cecilia and Kimberly Block Deer Park Fire Department
Ho Chen Deer Park Home Depot
Deer Park Girl Scout Troop 1163 Florence Findley
Deer Park Girl Scout Troop 3844 Great South Bay Audubon Society
Edna, Abigail and Eliana Gruvman Dr. Andrew Greller
Paul, Joanne and Paulie Hartmann Long Island Botanical Society
Barbara, Harry and George Kolk Long Island Mycological Society
Valerie and Catherine Pfundstein NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
Vicky Ruvio The Honorable Steven Stern
Twila Silverman Tom Richardson, 2nd Asst. Chief, DPFD
David Tomko Town of Babylon
West Babylon Boy Scout Troop 104 Town of Huntington

Photo courtesty of Paul Tomko
!————————————————YES!
I want to help! Friends of the Edgewood Preserve is an all-volunteer not-for-profit organization. Please
consider a donation of any amount. Donations are tax-deductible.

Name_____________________________________E-Mail______________________________
Address_________________________________________Telephone_____________________
Amount enclosed:___$10 ______$20 ______$30 _____$50 _____$100 _____$250 ____Other
Make check payable to: Friends of the Edgewood Preserve, P.O. Box 162, Deer Park, NY 11729
_______I cannot donate at this time, but please add my name to your mailing list.

SAVE THE DATES! SAVE THE DATES! SAVE THE DATES!

The New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation’s Education staff will lead several walks
in 2009 at the Edgewood Preserve. Walks are free. This is an amazing opportunity for families
to learn about the preserve from the agency that owns and manages this land. MORE DETAILS
IN OUR SPRING NEWSLETTER, BUT A PREVIEW FOLLOWS…

Tuesday, April 6, 11AM – Birds, Bugs and Buds at Edgewood. Hunt for signs
of spring! A family hike through the forest and field paths to look for songbirds, insects
and plants awakening from winter slumber. Best for children five years and older.

Saturday, May 9 at 11AM – Family Woodland Hike. Family hike through the
pine barrens habitat. Learn about the kinds of animals and plants that are found here.
Learn how forests recover from fire as we explore a burned area of the preserve.

Sunday, June 21 at 11AM – Father & Child Hike. Celebrate Father’s Day by
exploring the woods with your kids. We’ll walk the trails, looking for bird nests, snakes,
toads and insects and learn about this very special 850-acre nature preserve.

FRIENDS of the EDGEWOOD PRESERVE

P.O. Box 162
Deer Park, NY 11729
TO:

Edgewood Trail at dusk. New Year’s Eve 2008

Photo courtesy of Patricia Burkhart

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.